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The Morning Show with Garrison Keillor - part 1 of 2

Dec 3, 1970
Garrison Keillor

Morning Show December 1970 Part 1 of 2. Date unknown, no complete date on log sheet. From transcript of newscast events show date is estimated at December 3, 1970.

 

Transcription by codeMantra, LLC:
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  KSJN operates on the federally assigned frequency of 91.1 megacycles, with an effective radiated power of 16,500 watts and an antenna height of 340 feet above average terrain.  KSJN serving Minneapolis, St. Paul has transmission facilities located in New Brighton, Minnesota.  It is amazing that very heavy snow has fallen to the north of it, it's nownow two feet, but quite a heavy snow, nine inches at Hibbing, six at Bemidji, three inches in Fargo, and just hardly a trace here in the St. Cloud area.  Cloudy skies through tomorrow with perhaps some more snow coming into Minnesota on Saturday.  Right now in the Twin Cities, the temperature is 19, sky is clear.  St. Cloud, clear and 10 degrees, Duluth, partly cloudy and 12, and we don't have the temperature for Rochester there unfortunately.  We have played parts of this album before; the new album by the St. John's University Men's Chorus.  Right now, we might play a large part of it in the next 25 minutes or so; new album by the St. John's University Men's Chorus, recorded in concert last February.  The college is St. Benedict's in St. Joseph, the Benedicta Arts Center.  Arthur Hayne inaudible stations made the original tape recording.  The chorus is directed by Axel Theimer.  We hear them in works of Giovanni da Croce, Palestrina, Scarlatti, Thomas Weelkes, Beethoven, Randall Thompson.  Cantate Domino by Giovanni da Croce, 'O Bone Jesu' and the 'Super flumina Babylonis' by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, 'Exultate Deo' by Alessandro Scarlatti, Two madrigals by Thomas Weelkes, 'The Nightingale,' and 'Hark, all ye lovely saints above' Foreign Language Golden Sun' by Beethoven, and 'Stopping by woods, snow evening' by Randall Thompson.  Music of Croce, Palestrina, Scarlatti, Weelkes, Beethoven, and Randall Thompson, sung by the St. John's University Men's Chorus in concert, Axle Theimer directing.
 
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ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY MEN'S CHORUS performs.
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  The St. John's University Men's Chorus in concert, recorded in February, and what we heard was the part of the concert that has been put on record, part of the record I should say.  Works of Giovanni da Croce, Palestrina, Scarlatti, Thomas Weelkes, Beethoven, Randall Thompson, and serenade by Franz Schubert, Axle Theimer was the director.  One and a half minutes past 7.  Good morning, you are listening to the morning program over these listener-supported stations.
 
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MALE SPEAKER  In Minneapolis, St. Paul, this is KSJN.
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  And at 2 minutes past 7, brief summary of late news.  The British diplomat, James Cross is now free after being held 60 days as a hostage of French-Canadian terrorists.  He plans to go home to England to join his wife there tomorrow.  The separatists who had held Cross, released him yesterday to the care of the Cuban consul in Montreal, then took a plane to exile in Havana, and Cross was freed after the plane landed there.  Cross told one official, "I am very happy to come back into the world.  There were times in the past eight weeks when I had almost given up hope".  State and Federal officials in Florida are hoping that the huge oil slick, about 25 miles off the eastern coast of Florida, will be blown out to sea by a western wind that was reported dissipating this morning, but they are still getting ready for a cleanup if it moves any closer to land.  In the Gulf of Mexico, Shell Oil Company began moving equipment to drill relief wells to choke off the oil and gas, which is burning on an offshore drilling platform off the coast of Louisiana.  Six of the drilling rig's wells now are burning; most of the oil was burning, there was little leakage.  Senator William Proxmire said he was astounded.  He was not the only one.  The Senate voted yesterday to stop development of the SST, and the vote was amazing, 52 to 41.  It was thought it would be extremely close.  Still the Appropriations Bill, which the SST money was a part, still has to go to a House Senate Conference Committee.  The house approved the SST and the Committee could restore the money for the plan.  Excuse me, Jordan's King Hussein is coming to Washington for a visit, and reportedly bringing with him a message, which outlines Egypt's intention to resume fighting unless the current ceasefire along the Suez Canal produces some results.  The Egyptian...Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram said the message, which Hussein will bring to Washington will be followed by a worldwide campaign by Egyptian diplomats to explain that Egypt has done all it can, "in the field of quiet diplomacy".  The Senate Appropriations Committee has approved a $66 billion Defense Appropriations Bill, and put on to it an amendment, which would forbid the use of any of the money for ground combat troops in Laos, Cambodia or Thailand.  Administration supporters made no move to oppose the amendment although it would somewhat be similar to the Cooper-Church Amendment, which would have forbidden the President to keep ground troops in Cambodia.  That amendment, by the way, is still held up in a house Senate conference committee.  In the case of Heikki Lunta, who was a full-time Finnish snow dancer who works the northern part Michigan, the Upper Peninsula.  When he dances, it is supposed to snow, and unbeknownst to some of the people on the Upper Peninsula, he also has a 'snow go away' dance.  A couple of weeks ago, Heikki Lunta did a dance for a snowmobile club near Hancock, Michigan for a two-dollar fee.  More than a foot of snow fell, but they never paid him off and so he did his 'snow go away dance'.  The snow melted.  A few days before they were going to have a snow mobile race, the snow mobile club asked him to come back and do his dance again.  He refused.  A radio station raised two dollars to pay his fee.  He danced, and it snowed yesterday in Upper Peninsula, more than a foot.  So it snows a lot up there.  It would be a safe profession to be in, I would say.  There was up to 8 inches of snow in Minnesota yesterday mainly in the northeast.  Schools were closed in Duluth, Hibbing.  In Duluth, winds were reported up to 65 miles an hour.  The freezing drizzle and rain mixed with snow over much of southern Minnesota.  Many residents in towns in northern Minnesota were said to have spent last night in schools, offices and other unlikely places of shelter because of the bad weather conditions.  There would be a few snow flurries in the north today, otherwise mostly cloudy skies through tomorrow over Minnesota.  With snow likely to develop tonight possibly mixed with some freezing rain in the south and the snow continuing into tomorrow, but ending in most sections by afternoon.  Highest today will range from 14 to 26 in the north and 25 to 35 in the south.  And in the Twin Cities, light snow with some freezing rain likely to develop tonight, continuing into tomorrow, but ending by tomorrow afternoon.  High today in the city should be about 32, down to 18 overnight, and the high tomorrow of 35.  There is a 70 percent chance of snow tonight in the Twin Cities.  Where it is right now 19 degrees, sky clear, St. Cloud 10 degrees and clear, Redwood Falls clear and 13, Fargo-Moorhead, very light snow and 6 above, and Duluth partly cloudy and 12 degrees.  And that's the news.  Time is nine minutes past 7, good morning.  Music until 12 noon today.  At 1030, concert form the Pan American Union in Washington DC.  Tape transcribed recital by the American University Singers.  Our program begins with music of Bach, two little instrumental fragments, which are not attached to any longer work, though they may remind you of parts of longer works, two Sinfonias by Bach and two choruses, carols from the St. Matthew Passion. 'Erkenne mich,' 'Know me, my keeper, my Shepherd, take me to thee,' and 'Was mein Gott will,' 'What my God wills may it ever be so.  His will, it is the best.  He is ready to help them that firmly believe in him', two orchestral fragments and two choruses from the St. Matthew Passion by Johann Sebastian Bach.
 
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MUSIC
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  Two Sinfonias by Johann Sebastian Bach and two carols from the St. Matthew Passion.  The Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by Otto Klemperer with the Philharmonia Choir.  Twenty minutes past 7, good morning.  We have just received some new recordings on the Musical Heritage Society label of complete piano works of Fryderyk Chopin, which include waltzes and nocturnes, Mazurkas, which are recorded elsewhere, but also a number of little tiny pieces that I haven't seen anywhere else.  A variation from the Hexameron, Cantabile in B-flat major, which is about 50 seconds in length, an album piece in E-major and Contradance in B-flat major.  At least two of the pieces were written by Chopin for ladies who had come up to admire him and he wrote them, these little things, to put into their album.  Barbara Hesse-Bukowska is the pianist, four little fragments by Chopin.
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  Four little piano pieces by Chopin.  Variations from the Hexameron, Cantabile in B-flat major, album piece in E-major, and Contradance in B-flat major.  We will listen to three lively Christmas anthems by William Billings, colonial American composer in just a minute or two.  Christmas songs, which sound like dances and are sung that way by the Greg Smith singers.  The last one of the three, sort of sounds a little bit like 'The girl I left behind me', so we can hear that tune also played on the banjo, and some hunting music to get you off to the hunt this morning and little train imitation piece played by a string band.
 
There was a lot of snow that fell last night up in North Eastern Minnesota if you are looking to go skiing up north this weekend.  It is all up there on the ground.  Somebody might as well get the use of it and there will be more snow moving into the state tonight from North Dakota.  The weather bureau calls it an intense weather cell, which would be moving into the state, but does not say how much snow will be there, maybe just a small amount of snow, but intense snow, not passive snow.  Light snow or some freezing rain is forecast for the Twin Cities tonight, will continue into tomorrow but probably end by Saturday afternoon.  The high today in the city should be about 32 and there is a 70 percent chance of snow or freezing rain tonight.  19 degrees in the Twin Cities, the sky is clear, St. Cloud clear and 10 above.  It is snowing right now in Fargo and in Alexandria, 6 degrees in Fargo, 11 degrees in Alexandria.  The time is 31 minutes past 7, and you are listening to the morning program over these listener-supported stations.
 
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MALE SPEAKER  Serving you 19 hours each day in stereo, this is KSJN from Minneapolis St. Paul at 91.1.
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  Good morning to you and a very Merry Christmas, and here are the three songs by William Billings.
 
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CHRISTMAS SONGS by WILLIAM BILLINGS
 
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MALE SPEAKER  You know, once upon a time there was little boy that - he used to want to go out hunting with his father.  His father would be out with the hounds all night long.  He'd hear them barking and he wanted to come too, but always his father would say, "No, you are too young, stay home", the way they do.  And he begged and he begged, he was such a pest that finally his father said, "All right, all right you can come, next birthday, not now".  His father thought he would forget, but he didn't.  And the next birthday rolled around, as birthdays do, and he reminded his father of the promise.  "Well", the father says, "all right, you can come...you can come with me, but don't expect me to slow down.  If you get lost out in the woods, you just gonna have to find your way home by yourself".  The boy says, "That's all right.  I'll take along my horn and if I get lost, I will blow it.  Know Blue, he is the lead hound dog.  He'll hear me.  He'll come -- bring me home".  So off they went.  But you know, he couldn't keep up.  They went faster and faster, and he got farther and farther behind.  He was out in the woods and he was all alone and it was nighttime.  He took out the horn and he blew it. "Oh Blue, where are you"  But all he could hear was a hoot owl.  He blew the horn again.  "Oh Blue...", but all he could hear was the hoot owl.  Then suddenly, way off in the distance, he could hear, "There they are," he says, "they are coming back, right around the mountain, right where I am".
 
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SONG continues.
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  That was the Circus Band by Charles Ives.  'All summer long we boys dream about big circus joys,' sung by the Greg Smith singers with the Colombia Chamber Orchestra, and before, the Mahogany Stomp.  Muggsy Spanier and his All-Star band with a little train imitation piece called, 'The morning train,' played by Greenbrier Boys.  Time is exactly 8 o'clock, and you are listening to the morning program over these listener-supported stations.
 
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MALE SPEAKER  You are tuned to KSJN 91.1, St. Paul, Minneapolis.
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  The British diplomat James Cross is free this morning after he has been held for 60 days as a hostage by French-Canadian separatists.  He plans to go home to England to join his wife there tomorrow.  The separatists who had held Cross, released him yesterday to the care of the Cuban consul in Montreal, then took a plane to exile into Havana.  Cross was freed after the plane landed.  It all began October 5th when members of the Quebec Liberation Front kidnapped Cross and demanded gold, publicity and freedom for jailed separatists as part of the price for his release.  The Canadian Government refused, then a Quebec government official, Pierre Laporte was kidnapped.  The government replied with an offer to fly the kidnappers to Cuba if they would only release the men.  One cell of the FLQ replied by killing Laporte.  The government announced that the offer is still held for the other cell, the one holding Cross, but the government then invoked emergency measures and started hunting down members of the FLQ, the Quebec Liberation Front.  Yesterday, police surrounded a home in a quiet residential neighborhood of Montreal.  The separatists inside threw out a message saying they would accept the government's offer of safe passage if their families could go along, and the government agreed.  Cross was finally released.  He told one official, "I am very happy to come back into the world.  There were times in the past eight weeks when I had almost given up hope".  A fact-finding mission sent out by the United Nations reports that the sea-borne invasion of Guinea, about two weeks ago, was carried out by units of the Portuguese Armed Forces.  The report was submitted to the UN Security Council.  Portugal denied involvement in the invasions, which were beaten back.  State and Federal officials in Florida are looking out the sea this morning hoping that a huge oil slick about 25 miles off the eastern coast will be blown out to sea by a western wind that's moving out now and was reported dissipating this morning, but they are still getting ready to clean it up if it moves in towards the coast.  In the Gulf of Mexico, Shell Oil Company began moving equipment in to drill relief wells to choke off the oil and gas, which is burning on offshore drilling platform south of Louisiana.  Six of the wells on the drilling rig now have reported a fire.  The semiofficial Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram says that King Hussein of Jordan is carrying a message to Washington, which outlines Egypt's intention to resume the fighting unless the current ceasefire along the Suez Canal produces some negotiations.  It says the message to Washington will be followed by a worldwide campaign by Egyptian diplomats to explain that Egypt has done all it can in the field of quiet diplomacy.  The senate voted yesterday to stop development of the SST.  Senator William Proxmire said he was astounded, mainly because of the large margin of victory.  The SST was voted down 52 to 41.  Nonetheless, the house did approve it.  And so, the matter of the SST is up for...still has to be settled by a house Senate Conference Committee, which will try and negotiate the two versions of the bill, the Appropriations Bill for the transportation department, which the SST money was a part.  The Senate Appropriations Committee has approved a $66 billion Defense Appropriations Bill and tacked on to it an amendment, which would forbid the use of any of the money for ground combat troops in Laos, Cambodia or Thailand.  There was no move to oppose the amendment on the part of administration supporters, although it is somewhat similar to the Cooper-Church Amendment, which would have forbidden the President from retaining ground troops in Cambodia.  The Cooper-Church is still stalled in a house Senate Conference Committee.  The Appropriations Bill is more than $2 billion less than the administration has asked for, but it does not include money for military pay raises, which must be separately funded.
 
Two American soldiers have been sentenced to death in Seoul, South Korea, for the robbery and murder of a South Korean couple.  Sergeant John Blunt, Specialist Fourth Class, James Walter sentenced today, were the first American soldiers ever condemned to death by a South Korean Court.  They were found guilty of murdering a Korean couple after being refused drugs on credit.  Three more members of the Minnesota Eight have been convicted, by a Federal Court Jury, of attempted inference with a selective service system.  Brad Bennecke ph, Peter Simmons and Donald Olsen were arrested during a break-in at the Winona Selective Service Office in July, were found guilty late yesterday afternoon.  Two more men are still awaiting trial.
 
In New York, The Carnegie Commission on Higher Education says that many colleges and universities across the country face a money crisis, and included among them, they said, is the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis.  According to the report issued yesterday in New York, the university is among one thousand colleges and universities heading for financial troubles in the near future.  A major factor, according to the commission, is recent campus unrest, which has caused, it said, an aura of distress among the general public.  And Reader's Digest has been charged with false misleading and deceptive advertising practices in Michigan.  Attorney General Frank Kelly cited such instances as indicating persons have been specially selected to take part in promotional games, naming individuals in its marketing promotions without their consent and offering a free mystery gift, which carries with it the unlawful requirement that it takes a one-year subscription of the magazine to be eligible.  Kelly says he will seek a court injunction if the magazine doesn't cease and desist within 48 hours.
 
There was heavy snow in Northeastern Minnesota yesterday.  Schools were closed in Duluth, Hibbing and many other areas.  In fact, a lot of people spent the night in the schools and offices and other places other than their homes because of bad weather conditions, winds of up to 65 miles an hour in Duluth, up to eight inches of snow in many parts of Northeastern Minnesota.  There is more snow moving into Minnesota tonight.  It is in Montana this morning, what the Weather Bureau calls an intense weather cell, but does not say how much snow we may get from it.  They say snow flurries actually, well, no they don't.  Snow flurries in the north today, but then, snow developing tonight possibly mixed with some freezing rain in the south.  The snow will continue into Saturday, but end in most of the state by Saturday afternoon.  Highest today across the state will range from 14 to 26 in the north, 25 to 35 in the south, and the weather would be about the same on Saturday.  The high today in the cities should be about 32 down to 18 tonight.  The high tomorrow at 35.  There is a 70 percent chance of light snow or some freezing rain developing tonight in the Twin Cities, continuing into tomorrow, but probably ending by tomorrow afternoon.  The wind is out of the north becoming light and variable today, southeasterly 10 to 16 miles an hour tonight, and fair to partly cloudy skies today.  The Twin Cities with increasing cloudiness tonight as the snow moves in upon us.  And that is the news and the weather.  I have some more poems by Edward Field that I wanted to read to you later in this hour.  Music until 12 o'clock noon today, including a transcribed recital from...concert from the Pan American Union of Washington DC, by the American University Singers, and the news at 12.  This is a...these, I can't recall the title of this by an old New Orleans Jazz Band.  II am justlet me check the record, just a moment.  Oh yeah, Paul Barbarin and his...and his band.  Paul Barbarin isis the drummer.  Some of these musicians I think have come up here to Minnesota to perform.  Seems as if I remember some of their names, Louis Cottrell, clarinet, Emmanuel Sayles, banjo, music from Preservation Hall in New Orleans, and this is a tune called 'Give it up', Paul Barbarin's Band.
 
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PAUL BARBAIN'S BAND plays 'GIVE IT UP.'
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  That was Paul Barbarin's Band from Preservation Hall in New Orleans, and that piece was not called 'Give it up'that piece was not called 'Too late,' it was called 'Give it upgive it up, it is too late.'  16 minutes past 8.  This is Bessie Smith, James P. Johnson is the pianist, in the Columbia releases inaudible.
 
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MILES DAVIS ET AL play 'ROUND MIDNIGHT.'
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  Miles Davis and his quintet.  The tune by Thelonious Monk called 'Round Midnight.'  John Coltrane was the tenor saxophonist.  28.5 minutes past 8, and you are listening to the morning program over these listener-supported stations.
 
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MALE SPEAKER  You are listening to KSJN, transmitting in stereo from Minneapolis, St. Paul.
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  I am looking over a book of poems by Edward Field.  It was published several years ago; he has published at least one since, 'Variety Photoplays', which is a fine book of funny poems, and there are not many of those these days.  This is his first book, which came out, I believe, in 1962 and won a prize of some sort.  Grove Press published it.  It is called 'Stand up friend with me'.  This is a poem called 'A bill to my father'.  I am typing up bills for a firm to be sent to their clients.  It occurs to me that firms are sending bills to my father who has that way an identity, I do not often realize.  He is a person who buys, owes and pays, not papa like he is to me.  His creditors reproach him for not paying on time with a bill marked 'please remit'.  I reproach him for never having shown his love for me, but only his disapproval.  He has a debt to me too, although I have long since ceased asking him to come across.  He does not know how, and so I do without it.  But in this impersonal world of business, he can be communicated with, with absolute assurance of being paid.  The boss writes, 'send me my money', and my father sends it.  And the telephone.  My happiness depends on an electric appliance and I do not mind giving it so much credit, with life in this city being what it is.  Each person separated from friends by a tangle of subways and buses.  Yes, my telephone is my joy.  It tells me that I am in the world and wanted.  It rings and I am alerted to love or gossip.  I go comb my hair, which begins to sparkle, without it I was like a bear in a cave drowsing through a shadowy winter.  It rings and spring has come.  I stretch and amble out into the sunshine, hungry again, as I pick up the receiver for the human voice and the good news of friends.
 
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GARRISON KEILLOR  And I am just looking here for another poem entitled 'The Journey'.  Here it is.  'A journey', by Edward Field.  When he got up that morning, everything was different.  He enjoyed the bright spring day, but he did not realize it exactly, he just enjoyed it.  And walking down the street to the railroad station, past magnolia trees with dying flowers like old....
 

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