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The Morning Show with Garrison Keillor - part 2 of 2

Dec 9, 1970
Garrison Keillor

The Morning Show. December 1970. Part 2 of 2 (two shows on reel). Date from transcript is December 9, 1970. Includes Garrison Keillor talking about the show start time varying from day to day while waiting for the New Brighton transmisster to come on.

Note: AUDIO BEGINS at 9:54.  Before that, this is a recording of dead air, which is what was actually on the air before the show began.

The below transcription was created by codeMantra, LLC:

000954
MALE SPEAKER  You are tuned to KSJN 91.1 St. Paul, Minneapolis.
 
001020
GARRISON KEILLOR  Good morning.  It is 21-12 minutes before 7 o'clock, and today is...I keep forgetting, today is a Wednesday, December the 9th, 1970.  Good morning, welcome to another day of broadcasting from the noncommercial stereo FM radio stations of Minnesota Educational Radio Incorporated.  KSJR operates on the federally assigned frequency of 90.1 megacycles with an effective radiated power of 150,000 watts and an antenna height of 480 feet above average terrain.  Studios and transmission facilities are located on the campus of St. John's University in Collegeville, Minnesota.  KSJN operates on the federally assigned frequency of 91.1 megacycles with an effective radiated power of 16,500 watts and an antenna height of 340 feet above average terrain.  KSJN serving Minneapolis, St. Paul has transmission facilities located in New Brighton, Minnesota.  And good morning to you, it is a morning program, which begins this morning with music of Gabrielle Faure.  We look at the news and the weather at 7, and again at 8 o'clock.  I am very disappointed that we were not able to get on the air earlier this morning.  By the way, the time that we get on the air in the morning varies from day to day because we have to wait for our transmitter to come on in New Brighton, and somebody else turns that on, so that's why we are late sometimes, waiting for them to do that.  I am disappointed that we can't hear all of the Faure Requiem that I wanted to play this morning.  We will be able to hear the Introit and Kyrie, the Sanctus, Pie Jesu, Agnus Dei as sung by the choir of Kings College, Cambridge and the new Philharmonia, David Wilcox conducting.
 
001336
CHOIR OF KING'S COLLEGE, PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA,  JOHANN SEBASTIAN sing
 
004125
GARRISON KEILLOR  We heard parts of the requiem by Gabrielle Faure.  The choir of King's College, Cambridge and the New Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by David Wilcox, and the short carol played by Johann Sebastian Bach actually to Timothy Langan, 'My heart is filled with longing,' played by Albert Schweitzer.  Ten minutes past 7 and we will look at the news in just a moment.  You are listening to the morning program over these listener-supported stations.  This morning's program made possible with the financial assistance of Petters Furs and Fabrics from St. Cloud.
 
004222
MALE SPEAKER  You are listening to KSJN transmitting in stereo from Minneapolis, St. Paul.
 
004245
GARRISON KEILLOR  I don't have a weather forecast this morning, I see.  We will have to wait for that.  Come little bit later I guess.  Committees of the House and the Senate are meeting today in trying to find a way to avert a nationwide railroad strike threatened for midnight tonight.  Congress has inaudible a legislation that would delay that for 45 days.  However, the President of one of the unions said that his men would ignore it and go on strike anyway.  The Nixon administration says that a strike would shut down much of the country's heavy industry, disrupt Christmas mail, a large part of it, and lead to shortages of consumer goods in a short period of time.  President Thieu of South Vietnam says his government is considering a one-month holiday ceasefire extending through the Tet, Lunar New Year.  He said it would be in cooperation with the United States, which announced similar plan yesterday.  He said he would announce his decision within a few days.  The Defense begins its case tomorrow in the case of the court martial of Lieutenant William Kelly.  The jurors were dismissed for today.  Defense motions will be presented today.  The government wound up its case against Kelly yesterday.  Senator Walter Mondale of Minnesota has a 70-page speech prepared for delivery today in the Senate in which he urges a new national commitment to the young people of this country, who he says have been "consigned to the scrapheap."  Mondale says that thousands of American children are starving, many more are the victims of disease because of lack of medical aid.  He said that all children are victimized by many forces, from misguided politicians to corporation that pollute the environment, to violence on television.  Test cases from New York and California are scheduled for the Supreme Court today, scheduled to be heard by the Court.  Cases which raise the question of whether a draftee can claim to be a conscientious objector on the basis of the...his objection to a particular war, the war in Vietnam alone.  The Supreme Court has never determined political considerations for conscientious objector status, and the local judges who ruled on it in the past have differed in their opinions.  The fate of MOER, Mobilization of Economic Resources, the poverty agency in Minneapolis in Hennepin County is still unknown.  The office of Economic Opportunity has said it will cut off funds, and there was a hearing in Chicago yesterday where MOER members tried to save the agency.  The POEO ph gave no indication whether it would rescind its decision to take away the money.  Fourteen minutes past 7, we will look at the news and we will have the weather at 8 o'clock.  Good morning, today is Wednesday, Wednesday December the 9th.  Music until 11 this morning.  At 11, a rebroadcast of our Sunday night public affairs program, a discussion from the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions lead by Harry S. Ashmore entitled 'Electoral Reform, What Happens When Everyone Loses' at 11 this morning.  This is an English folk tune, a Christmas song arranged by Ralph Vaughan William called 'On Christmas Night' sung by the Purcell Singers.
 
004725
THE PURCELL SINGERS sing 'ON CHRISTMAS NIGHT.'
 
004857
FRANCESCO LANDINI performs
 
005039
THE PURCELL SINGERS sing
 
005329
FRANCESCO LANDINI performs
 
005602
GARRISON KEILLOR  Two English Christmas songs arranged by Ralph Vaughan Williams, I keep forgetting, 'On Christmas night,' and the Wassail song sung by the Purcell Singers, and what you just heard was a little instrumental piece by Francesco Landini, Va pure amore and what sounded like portative organ, here just a few little creeks with a lute or perhaps a small harp.  No it wasn't a harp, I think it was a lute plucked along with it.  The time is 24-12 minutes past 7.  At 8 o'clock this evening, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra in a tape-transcribed concert.  The program for this evening's concert is different than what is listed in the preview magazine.  The soloist will be Thomas Tempel, oboist, and violinist, Bruce Allard, and the program includes an oboe concerto in C minor by Benedetto Marcello, and Handel Sonata in A major for violin and harpsichord, Scarlatti's symphony in E minor and the Telemann concerto grosso in D major for horn and orchestra.  Lawrence Barnhart is the horn soloist.  A concert with the full chamber orchestra and the Baroque Ensemble of the Chamber Orchestra.  Leopold Sipe conducting the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra in concert at 8 o'clock this evening.  Twenty-six minutes past 7 and we bid you good morning.
 
005822
MUSIC
 
010018
JACK ELLIOTT sings "HOWJADOO"
 
010146
NEILYOUNG AND OLD BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD sing
 
010403
GARRISON KEILLOR  Neil Young and the old Buffalo Springfield and the song by Woody Guthrie sung by Jack Elliott.  The time is 31-12 minutes past 7.  You are listening to the morning program, which this morning is made possible with the financial assistance of Petters Furs and Fabrics of St. Cloud over these listener-supported stations
 
010427
MALE SPEAKER  You are tuned to KSJM 91.1 Minneapolis, St. Paul.
 
010447
GARRISON KEILLOR  and the light is just beginning to come up in the East.  It is veryvery quiet here.  It is a little cave where we do this program and here at St. John's University in the morning, hardly anything stirring.  No highway in sight, just trees and brick buildings.  But somehow everyit seems like just about every morning about this time, I have recollections of trips I have taken traveling overnight and then still travelling as the sun comes up in the morning.  Thinking of taking, oh I guess it was about a yeara year-and-a-half ago, April it was.  Taking a bus up from Washington to New York, when I had to be in New York at 8 o'clock one morning, and the bus was nearly empty and everybody was asleep except me because I hadn't seen New York for a long time and because it is a horrible stretch, daytime or nighttime from Washington to New York up along the New Jersey turnpike.  There is nothing to see.  Everybody was asleep except me and two Japanese women were sitting in the seat ahead of me, two seats ahead of me, and they were all excited about seeing New York.  You could make out that much anyway of what they were saying.  For some reason, I thought they were schoolteachers, they seemed like they were schoolteachers.  It seemed like they were leading a whole class tour even though it was only themselves, pointing out everything and talking about it.  And as you come up to New York that way, there is, you are coming down through the industrial strip along the New Jersey turnpike and then what city would it be  It wouldn't be New York, would it  I don't know whatever city is in New Jersey, right across thethe shore, right across the river from New York.  As you come over a hill, there is a great hill up ahead of you with houses all over it and lights shining from it.  It is quite impressive, but it is only New Jersey, but the Japanese women thought it was New York City and they took turns scrunching up by theby the bus window and then the other one took a picture even though it was practically pitch black outside.  Took a picture with a flashbulb to get the other woman with New York, they thought, in the background.  They thought that was New York and then once they got their pictures, they were satisfied.  And the bus came up over that hill and then down to the river and then there was the real New York and down into the tunnel and light just coming up.  I am thinking also of couple of trips in the car, which you have toyou have to be some place and you don't have that much money and besidesit doesn'tit doesn't really matter.  So you drive all night with 4 or 5 people in the car sleeping and then the dawn coming up.  This is a song by Gordon Lightfoot, which is about traveling, thoughts of traveling asas the dawn comes up in the morning.  It is called the 'Long Thin Dawn.'  It is a kind of song that you might hear if you are out travelling all night, stopped in at a truck stop, somebody would be playing this on the jukebox, sung by Gordon Lightfoot.
 
011049
GORDON LIGHTFOOT sings 'LONG THIN DAWN.'
 
011351
JACK ELLIOTT sings
 
012114
GARRISON KEILLOR  That was Jack Elliott, something of his own invention and the time is 11-12 minutes before 8, and all this is making me sort of sentimental about trips.  This is the time of day when trips begin or time of the day when you are still traveling and thinking aboutabout overnight car trips and driving all night.  I guess it is something that you can't really describe using inaudible, have thought about this yourself or not, but thewhat is the word, thinking of the word affection, I guessI guess so.  The affection of passengers for each other on a long trip in a car, with 4 or 5 people riding in the car, the sort of asexual or pre-sexual, pre-adolescent intimacy just coming from a little group of people jammed into a tiny space, in a box, that is moving.  The car is a sort of your tree house or your clubhouse, I suppose.  Thinking of one trip out East overnight with a friend and his wife and his child who was about a year old, and myself all of us in the front seat and the hitchhiker in the back seat sleeping.  I don't know how he got to the back seat, but he did.  And the four of us in the front and the baby wound up on my lap and the baby's mother was sleeping with her head on my shoulder.  And I was sort of turned diagonally because my friend has short legs and the seat had to be moved up for him and I have long legs, and sort of shifting time to time in thatin that position all night.  Well, I guess you know what I mean.  It is 8 minutes before 8.
 
012421
MUSIC
 
012545
FEMALE SINGER sings
 
012759
MUSIC
 
012950
GARRISON KEILLOR  Another weather beaten sailor song by Thomas Campion and a little prelude for lute by Bach.  The time is 3 minutes before 8, mean I get to the news for a little while, there are some other things I want to do first.  The temperature in the Twin Cities is 23 degrees this morning and the sky is fair.  It says here that the temperature in St. Cloud is 12 degrees that seems little low, didn't seem that cold this morning.  If you want to believe, it is 22 you may, even 32.  Alexandria, it says, is 7 degrees.  Rochester 26 and cloudy, Redwood Fall 16, and Duluth, light snow falling 17 degrees.  You are listening to the morning program over these listener-supported stations.  This morning program made possible with the financial assistance of Petters Furs and Fabrics of St. Cloud.
 
013051
MALE SPEAKER  This is KSJN from St. Paul in Minneapolis.  The stereo broadcast service throughout Minnesota.
 
013106
ARETHA FRANKLIN sings
 
013401
JEFFERSON AIRPLANE sings
 
013658
SONG
 
014027
PETE SEEGER sings
 
014334
GARRISON KEILLOR  Pete Seeger and before him Aretha Franklin, the Jefferson Airplane, and Johnny Mitchell.  The time is 10-12 minutes past 8.  Mild weather today over Minnesota.  The temperature right now in the Twin Cities is 23 degrees and the high today would be about 40.  Sky is fair in the cities, but cloudy in Rochester with 26.  A light snow falling in Duluth, 17 degrees, St. Cloud 12 degrees, and I can see a few clouds in the sky.  Music until 11 this morning.  At 11 a rebroadcast of our Sunday night public affairs program from the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, a discussion lead by Harry S. Ashmore with Frank Mankowitz and Arthur Schlesinger Jr., 'Electoral Reform, What Happens When Everyone Loses'  The news at 12 noon.  Senators and congressmen are meeting today in committees trying to find a way to avert a nationwide railway strike threatened for midnight tonight, which the administration says would shut down much of the country's heavy industry, disrupt Christmas mail and lead to shortages of consumer goods in a short period of time.  Congress has before a legislation, which would put off the strike for least 45 days.  However, the President of one of the unions said yesterday, his men would ignore it and walk off their jobs, no matter what action the government took.  Later however, he was President CL Dennis of the Brotherhood of Railway and Airline Clerks.  Later he said, there was one way to avoid this strike and that would be if Congress granted workers a temporary pay increase in the same legislation that delayed the strike for a month-and-a-half.  The defense begins its case tomorrow and the court martial of Lieutenant William Kelly.  The jurors were dismissed for today while the court hears defense motions.  The government ended its case against Kelly yesterday.  During its presentation, the prosecution interviewed 35 witnesses in 12 days of testimony.  The last of them was James Derse of Brooklyn, New York, who said he refused to obey, what he called, Kelly's order to shoot defenseless women and children.  American soldiers have been ordered off the streets of Quinon in Northern and South Vietnam after about two thousand demonstrators marched through the streets yesterday protesting the shooting of a 12-year-old boy by an American solider.  Military sources said the boy was killed when a soldier fired a warning shot at some students, who were stealing supplies from a truck.  The boy was not one of them.  The demonstrators are demanding that the soldier be turned over to Vietnamese Courts for trial.  The UN Security Council has condemned Portugal for last month's attack against the Western African country of Guinea and the resolution calls on all nations to not give Portugal military equipment.  It also asks Portugal to give self-determination to its overseas territories.  Four major countries, the United States, France, Britain, and Spain did not vote in yesterday's action.  The House voted yesterday to give the money for development of the SST.  Last week, Senate had rejected, and so now, House and Senate conferees will have to decide what to do about the plan.  One possible comprise under discussion is for spending about two hundred million dollars for work on a prototype; two prototypes the SST that would be ninety million dollars less than the administration had asked for.  It would keep the project alive.  The congressmen, Edward Boland of Massachusetts, has said that the House Senate Conference will have a very hard time resolving their differences.  The Supreme Court will hear test cases from New York and California today, which raised the question whether a draftee can claim to be a conscientious objector on the basis of objection to one war, the war in Vietnam.  Political considerations for conscientious objector status have never been determined by the Supreme Court when they have considered it.  Local judges have come up with widely varying opinions.  Senator Walter Mondale has prepared a 70-page speech, which he will deliver today in the Senate on the problems of young people.  He is urging a new national commitment.  He says the nation's youth have been "consigned to the scrapheap."  Mondale says that thousands of American children are starving and many more are the victims of disease because of lack of medical aid.  And he says that all children healthy or not are victimized by many forces, from misguided politicians to corporations that pollute the environment and put violence on television.  There was a hearing in Chicago yesterday to decide the fate of MOER, Mobilization of Economic Resources, the poverty agency in Minneapolis.  Its fate is still unknown.  The Office of Economic Opportunity had said it would cut off funds for MOER and it has given no indication yet whether it will rescind that decision.  It turns out there is a problem of pollution in the tropical paradise of Hawaii, probably because so many people go out there to escape from pollution in the continental United States.  The Executive Vice President of the Hawaii Hotel Association, Robert Rinker ph, told his colleagues in the hotel and tourist trades in Honolulu, reminding them that pollution warnings are posted on the ocean just one-and-a-half miles from Waikiki Beach.  He said that if pollution signs are ever posted on the beach itself, the visitor industry and the entire economy of the state could suffer a blow from which it might never recover.  So he is urging both Honolulu and the State of Hawaii to take immediate action to locate the source of pollution, some kind of bacterial pollution, and proceed quickly on building a sewage treatment plan.  The President of the University of Minnesota, Dr. Malcolm Moos spoke yesterday at the college of St. Catherine in St Paul.  A speech in which he said he did not think that unrest on campuses has come to an end.  Moos said yesterday that he often asks himself if the campus situation is calmer  If students have turned inward, as he said, if the worst is over  And he said, his answer is always no.  He went beyond that and said the university needs to assert itself and decide how it is going to face the changing difficult society.  And the Minnesota State Senate Education Subcommittee on Special Problems turned out a report yesterday in which it said it doesn't think there needs to be any new laws to control campus unrest or campus violence in Minnesota.  Subcommittee said, "on the basis of the hearing held, no indication of any action was seen."
 
GARRISON KEILLOR  The weather will be mild today over Minnesota.  A little lower temperature are expected over much of the state along with precipitation in some areas, light rain or snow in southern Minnesota, snow in the north.  A high today in the Twin City should be about 40.  The temperature right now is 23 and the sky is fair in Minnesota, highest today ranging from 20 to 34 in the north, from 33 to 40 in the south.  In St. Cloud, the Weather Bureau says the temperature is 12 degrees though it doesn't seem that cold.  Redwood Falls 16, Rochester cloudy and 26, and the light snow falling in Duluth, 17 degrees.  Sunrise in the Twin Cities was at 739 this morning and the sun will set at 432 this afternoon.  That's the news and the weather, and it brings us to exactly 20 minutes past 8 o'clock.  If you are leaving us now, we hope you can rejoin us this evening for events, issues, and ideas, an hour long news on public affairs program at 7, which is followed at 8 o'clock by our weekly tape-transcribed concert by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra.  Tonight's program, an oboe concerto in C minor by Benedetto Marcello, Handel Sonata in A major for violin and harpsichord, a Scarlatti's symphony in E minor and Telemann concerto grosso in D major for horn and orchestra.  The intermission guest and commentator for tonight's program will be the harpsichordist for the orchestra, Leighton James.  St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, in concert, Leopold Sipe conducting at 8 o'clock this evening in stereo.  I don't know how I get from there over to here, I guess, just put your foot out and step down.
 
015448
MUSIC
 
015857
MUSIC
 
020440
GARRISON KEILLOR  That was the Hungarian dance number five by Johannes Brahms played on the pedal harpsichord by E. Power Biggs and before it, Boccherini Minuet in A major, the guitar piece by the Reverend Gary Davis called 'The Boy Was Kissing The Girl And Playing The Guitar At The Same Time,' and the song by a group whose name I don't remember, perhaps just as well forgotten called 'You Took My Heart To The Cleaners.'  The time is 32 minutes past 8.  We will pause for station identification and look at some things that are going on tonight.  You are listening to the morning program over these listener-supported stations.
 
MALE SPEAKER  In Minneapolis St. Paul, this is KSJN.
 
GARRISON KEILLOR  The poet, Kenneth Koch, has been working